Great Books of the World – Part 20

“After all, if you do not resist
the apparently inevitable,
you will never know how
inevitable the inevitable was.”

Terry Eagleton

“The future doesn’t belong
to the fainthearted.
It belongs to the brave.”

Ben Lerner

 

The book I am going to write about today is as much unusual as it is of vital importance, and written by a former Stanford Medical School professor Bruce H. Lipton Ph.D., a renowned cell biologist,Β  who conducted scientific research into the link between mind and matter, and how the cells inside our body, our DNA, are affected by our thoughts. His findings show a ‘missing link’ between life and consciousness. It is the science of how thoughts control life and The Biology of Belief is his book’s title. It is universally accepted that genes and DNA do not control our biology, instead, they are controlled by signals from outside the cells, including powerful messages coming from our thoughts. These findings provide us with knowledge of how to achieve a healthy and happy life. When we transform our conscious and subconscious thoughts, we not only transform our lives but we help humanity to evolve to a new level of understanding and tolerance.

He received the Goi Peace Award (2009), and USA Book News Best Science Book (2016).

BRUCE H. LIPTON Ph.D.

Born on 21 October 1944 in Mount Kisco, New York, USA

Mount Kisco

Bruce Lipton’s interest in science started when at seven years old he was introduced at school to a microscope. While other children were excited to see ‘something’, and then moved on and forgot about it, he saw the organism shown there not as a cell but as a thinking, sentient being. As he recalled, this single-celled organism appeared to him to be on a mission, although what kind of mission he didn’t know. This ordinary, everyday school experience transformed his life and gave a direction to his future. He begged his mum to buy him a microscope and when he got one, he would spend hours mesmerised by this secretive world that he could access only through the eye of the optical instrument.

Later, while a research scientist at a university laboratory, he could use a complex microscope that was a massive, foot-thick chromium steel column of electromagnetic lenses that rose to the ceiling in the centre of the lab. While his professor guided him through the maze of cells, “Here’s a mitochondrion, there’s a Golgi body, over there is a nuclear pore, this is collagen molecule, that’s a ribosome.” This electron microscope brought him face to face with molecules that were the foundation of life itself. Somehow, without understanding how, he knew that the cell mysteries were going to be his future.

(a) Most light microscopes in a college biology lab can magnify cells up to approximately 400 times and have a resolution of about 200 nanometres. (b) Electron microscopes provide much higher magnification, 100,000 times, and have a resolution of 50 picometres.

His prediction materialised throughout his professional life. Lipton’s exploration of the “secrets of life” led him into a research career studying the character of cloned human cells. When in 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick described the structure and function of the DNA double helix, biologists became extremely excited, and the thought that DNA controls biological life became dogma. To cut it short – if you were born with a defective happiness gene, you were expected to have an unhappy life!

At that time, Lipton was having an incredibly stressful time in his life. With disastrous events piling up one after another, and close to a mental breakdown, he found a way out by escaping to teach at a Medical School in the Caribbean, on a short sabbatical post. His delight at landing at a tiny paradise island,Β  Montserrat.

He described his new home as a Garden of Eden, surrounded by the sparkling aquamarine sea, and with balmy air filled with the scent of masses of gardenias. Reading his description of coming out of rat-race industrialised America, to this heavenly land, where the late afternoon was devoted to quiet meditation by the natives, a habit he readily adopted, and after a swim in warm, ‘gin-clear’ water, he watched the sun setting slowly into the sea. Like a carefree child, he again felt the pleasure of being alive. The pastimes included snorkelling among the jewelled coral reefs which allowed him to observe the integration of plants and animal species, living in utmost harmony.

Lipton’s next few years were spent going to and fro from the Caribbean to the U.S. and back, lurching into music shows production and having a time of looking for something different. Luckily, he realised that science, research, and teaching, were all the things he was good at and he came back to it. He also started to think that we are not the victims of our genes, but masters of our fates, and we could create lives full of happiness and love and peace. He decided to test this theory by making himself happy.

Lipton analysed his thinking of cells as human-like and was humbled by the complexity and power of seemingly simple, moving blobs in a petri dish. The basic components of a cell are – the nucleus that contains genetic material, the energy-producing mitochondria, the protective membrane at the outside rim, and the cytoplasm in between. But within these anatomically simple-looking cells is a complex world; these smart cells use technologies that scientists have yet to fully fathom. Those smart cells are actively seeking environments that support their survival while avoiding hostile ones. They can survive on their own when a single cell is removed from a body and grown in a culture.

It isn’t surprising that cells are so smart. Single-cell organisms were the first life form on earth. The fossil evidence is proof they were here around 600 million years after our planet was formed. For the next 2.75 billion years of Earth history, only free-living, single cell-organisms – bacteria, algae, and amoeba-like protozoans – populated the world. These smart cells became smarter when the first multicellular organism, plants and animals appeared.

Above is an artist’s impression of the primordial soup, in which the first life on Earth may have originated, and below are biomolecules, which may have been precursors to life.

The latest scientific findings, which Lipton had already discovered thirty years ago, maintain that the membrane is the true brain of the cellular operation. The latest research suggests that one day, this knowledge will lead to greatly important medical breakthroughs.

His book covers so many interesting topics of life, the biosphere, and nature, that it is easy to understand the immense popularity of his lectures and he toured the world to spread the awareness of how we can profoundly change our lives for the better. Here are examples of co-operation in the biosphere but it would work as well for humans. The pistol shrimp gathers the food while its partner, the yellow gobi fish protects it from predators,

and a species of hermit crab that carries a pink anemone on top of its shell. Fish and octopuses like to feed on hermit crabs, but when they approach this species, the anemone shoots out its brilliantly coloured tentacles, with their microscopic batteries of poisoned darts, and stings the potential predator, encouraging it to look elswere for its meal. The anemone gets to eat the leftovers of the crab’s food.

Lipton writes how stress can make us dangerously ill, and how he actively monitored where he was expending his brain’s energy. We can harness the power of our mind and make it more effective than the drugs we have been programmed to believe we need. He rightly believes that energy is a more efficient means of affecting matter than chemicals. Genes don’t control biology. Yet, he warns that just ‘positive thinking ‘ leads always to physical cures. You need more to harness control of your body and your life. It is important, in his view, for our health and well-being to shift our mind’s energy towards positive, life-generating thought and eliminate the ever-present, energy-draining and debilitating negative thoughts. But, the mere thinking of positive thoughts will not necessarily have any impact on our lives at all.

Lipton’s theory is that we must understand that the seemingly ‘separate’ subdivisions of the mind, the conscious and the subconscious, are interdependent. The conscious mind – which represents the seat of our personal identity, source, or spirit – is the creative mind. It can see into the future, review the past, or disconnect from the present moment as it solves problems in our head. In its creative capacity, the conscious mind holds our wishes, desires, aspirations for our lives. It is the mind that conjures up our ‘positive thoughts.’

“In contrast, the subconscious mind is primarily a repository of stimulus-response tapes derived from instincts and learned experiences. The subconscious mind is fundamentally habitual; it will play the same behavioural responses to life’s signals over and over again, much to our chagrin. The subconscious mind is more than a million times more powerful than the conscious mind. If the desires of the conscious mind conflict with the programs in the subconscious mind, which ‘mind’ do you think will win out? You can repeat the positive affirmation that you are lovable over and over or that your cancer tumour will shrink. But if, as a child, you repeatedly heard that you were worthless and sickly, those messages programmed in your subconscious mind will undermine your best conscious efforts to change your life.”

“I believe the greatest problem we face is that we think we are running our lives with the wishes, desires, and aspirations created by our conscious mind. When we struggle or fail to obtain our goals, we are generally led to conclude that we are victims of outside forces preventing us from reaching our destination. However, neuroscience has now established that the conscious mind runs the show, at best, only about 5 percent of the time. It turns out that the programs acquired by the subconscious mind shape 95% or more of our life experiences.

Since subconscious programs operate without the necessity of observation or control by the conscious mind, we are completely unaware that our subconscious minds are making our everyday decisions. Our lives are essentially a printout of our subconscious programs, behaviors that were fundamentally acquired from others (our family, and community) before we were six years old.”

In this extract, Lipton writes about the complementary work of Candace Pert:

“At the same that I was studying the mechanics of the cell’s brain and gaining insight into the operation of the human brain, Candace Pert was studying the human brain and becoming aware of the mechanics of the cell’s brain. In Molecules of Emotion, Pert revealed how her study of information-processing receptors on nerve cell membranes led her to discover that the same ‘neutral’ receptors were present on most, if not all, of the body’s cells. Her elegant experiments established that the ‘mind’ was not focused in the head but was distributed via signal molecules to the whole body. As importantly, her work emphasised that emotions were not only derived through the feedback of the body’s environmental information. Through self-consciousness, the mind can use the brain to generate ‘molecules of emotion’ and override the system. While proper use of consciousness can bring health to an ailing body, inappropriate unconscious control of emotions can easily make a healthy body diseased.”

In this interesting extract, Lipton tackles our beliefs that ‘doctor knows better’:

“The placebo effect should be a major topic of study in medical school. I believe that medical education should train doctors to recognise the power of our internal resources. Doctors should not dismiss the power of the mind as something inferior to the power of chemicals and scalpel. They should let go of their conviction that the body and its parts are essentially stupid and that we need intervention to maintain our health. I believe the reason the mind has so summarily been dismissed in medicine is the result not only of dogmatic thinking, but also of financial considerations. If the power of your mind can heal your sick body, why should you go to the doctor, more importantly, why would you need to buy drugs?”

This extract extols the power of our beliefs:

“Our positive and negative beliefs not only impact our health but also every aspect of our life. Consider the people who walk across coals without getting burned. If they wobble in the steadfastness of their belief that they can do it, they wind up with burned feet. Your beliefs act like filters on a camera, changing how you see the world. And your biology adapts to those beliefs. When we truly recognise that our beliefs are that powerful, we hold the key to freedom. While we cannot readily change the codes of our genetic blueprints, we can change our minds and, in the process, switch the blueprint used to express our genetic potential.

Don’t try this at home!!

“My point is that you can choose what to see, you can filter your life with rose-coloured beliefs that will help your body grow or you can use a dark filter that turns everything black and makes your body/mind more susceptible to disease. You can live a life of fear or live a life of love. You have the choice! But I can tell you that if you choose to see a world full of love, your body will respond by growing in health. Learning how to harness your mind to promote growth is the secret of life, which is why I called this book The Biology of Belief. Of course, the secret of life is not a secret at all. Teachers like Buddha and Jesus have been telling us the same story for millennia. Now science is pointing in the same direction. It is not our genes but our beliefs that control our lives. Positive thoughts are a biological mandate for a happy, healthy life.”

Giant Buddha statue in Hong Kong

In this extract, Lipton describes his moment of enlightenment when he had to visit a chiropractor after a serious motorbike accident:

“I resembled a yelping version of Quasimodo. One of my students suggested that it might help if I visited his roommate, a fellow student, who was also a chiropractor. I not only have never been to a chiropractor, I had been taught by my allopathic community to shun chiropractors as quacks. But when you are in that much pain, you wind up trying things you would never consider in your cushier moments. At the chiropractor’s makeshift dormitory ‘office’ I was introduced for the first time to kinesiology, popularly known as muscle testing. The chiropractor told me to hold out my arm and resist the downward pressure he applied to it. I had no problem resisting the light force he put on my arm. Then he asked me to hold out my arm and resist him again while I said ‘My name is Bruce’. Again, I had no trouble resisting him, but by now I was starting to think that the admonishments of my academic colleagues were right on the mark – ‘This is nuts!’ Then, the chiropractor told me to hold out my arm and resist pressure while saying earnestly, ‘My name is Mary’. To my amazement, my arm flopped down, despite my strong resistance. ‘Now wait a minute,’ I said. ‘I must not have been resisting enough, try that again.’ We did, and this time I concentrated even more forcefully on resisting. Nevertheless, after repeating, ‘My name is Mary’, my arm sank like a stone. This student, who was now my teacher, explained that when your conscious mind has a belief that is in conflict with a formerly learned ‘truth’ stored in the subconscious mind, the intellectual conflict expresses itself as a weakening of the body’s muscles. To my astonishment, I realised that my conscious mind was not in control when I voiced an opinion that differed from a truth stored in the unconscious mind. More shocking was the fact that this hidden mind was actually more powerful than my conscious mind.

 

 

I wanted to add here just a little intervention as we are talking about keeping the body healthy and I am a great admirer of the greatest of nature’s gifts to mankind – Garlic.

Recently scientists discovered that organic garlic prevents the harmful side effects of antibiotics, and also that it enhances the body’s response to further use of them. This prevents the body from not responding to the often essential further future treatment.

To summarise, Bruce Lipton’s book offers a breakthrough discovery of how to take full responsibility for our lives, our health, and our happiness. No drugs needed.

At the end, I give you the wisdom-words of Mahatma Gandhi:

Your beliefs become your thoughts
Your thoughts become your words
Your words become your actions
Your actions become your habits
Your habits become your values
Your values become your destiny

 

 

 

 

 

97 thoughts on “Great Books of the World – Part 20

  1. Thanks for suggesting the book Biology of Belief. I will get the book soon and read it. Though, you have given the crux of the book beautifully, Thanks Joanna!

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Joanna, I thoroughly enjoyed your review of Dr. Lipton’s book. The illustrations greatly enhanced my understanding of the text. Very well-written! ❀ Have a great week!

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Great book review on Bruce Lipton Joanna. He is well regarded in Palo Alto and his story is one to be applauded. I love his early year inquisitveness and fascination with the microscope. He has made great strides in quantum physics and the body mind connection and truly has done amazing work. You truly did an outstanding job breaking this down and highlighting his work. Have a great weekend! πŸ’–

    Liked by 4 people

  4. A beautiful read, once again, Joanna. Biology of Belief sounds like quite and interesting read. Will try to check it out. Thank you for a beautiful article, stay blessedβ€οΈβ€οΈπŸ™πŸ’

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Thank you, Cindy, Bruce covered so much in his research and findings, that it was just my attempt to give an idea of what we could do to change our perception of life.
    Thank you.

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Thank you. Greatly appreciated.

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  7. You’re so welcome Joanna! He sure did but getting it out to a larger community like you did helps spread the word!!!! And you explained it so well!πŸ’–

    Liked by 3 people

  8. You’re soooo welcome!πŸ‘

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Thank you, Cheryl, you are very kind! Yes, I think that illustrations are essential.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Thank you, again. Greatly appreciated.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Thank you, Dr Bhambu, I am glad that you found the ideas of Bruce Lipton interesting. Scientific proof is important.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Thank you, Diana, I am so glad that you liked Bruce’s ideas, which are quite complex but worth the attention. It certainly made Bruce a very happy man.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Positive beliefs brings positive happenings!

    Liked by 4 people

  14. Thank you. You got it in one!!

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Thank you so much for another beautifully researched and presented book Joanna.

    I learned of Biology of Belief from Dr Venkat long back when I did my natural living course with her.

    My Guruji, Paramahansa Yogananda, has also said that we can overcome all hereditary and genetic stuff by our thoughts and will power πŸ™πŸ™
    It works. I have tested and tasted it 😊

    Every cell of ours has pure wisdom πŸ™πŸ™

    Liked by 4 people

  16. Hello Joanna,
    Your article is fascinating and very optimistic.
    I am delighted that a new generation of scientists is sowing the seeds that will make us repel the tyranny of drugs at all costs.
    The power of the mind is, I think, limitless, of real and great power.
    The analysis of this man, which you explained very well, is really
    limpid, the conscious although less powerful than the unconscious, and we have a power over it, and it is up to us to summon it and make it prosper simply by the practice of the present moment, by the keen awareness of our life, in these smallest details and the infinity of its riches …
    To illustrate my point, I would like to give you a few examples.
    For the past few months I have removed sugar from my diet.
    I feel much better. My friends see it, and often tell me, “I can’t do this, it’s too hard, I can’t do without the sugar, it must be horrible …”
    Well, I’m telling you, it’s not true.
    These are beliefs, because sugar today too widespread, and a real poison in our diet, has become a very particular food, the only one that causes addiction.
    While the body, this body so intelligent and so full of resources, is not addicted to fat, fruits, vegetables, but yes, sugar.

    Another example, 8 years ago my brother learned that he has a serious illness (a sort of multiple sclerosis – Schrumpel-Lorrain disease). This neurological disease is in the family and we thought it only affected my uncle (reached since the age of 14, this disease wakes up at any time of life, it is part of the long lists of so-called “orphan” diseases). Since this evil broke out on my brother, my brother decided that we all had it, one day while shouting he said to me “we all have it”. Casting her anger at me like some sort of curse or curse …
    It disturbed me enormously, I was devastated, my mind was disturbed, I gradually let this belief enter me.
    And then I decided to get into yoga in a much more involved way. Thanks to the assiduous practice of yoga and with long sessions of meditation, I made the relationship that I had with my body grow, I was able to penetrate my body, I traveled for a long time within me. And I have acquired the intimate conviction that I have nothing, that I do not have this disease. One might think that it is a belief that comes into resistance against another belief. I do not believe that. It is a powerful and intimate feeling, perhaps also I decided in a fine way and by a physical and psycho-sensory approach not to let myself be invaded by the villainous wave of resignation and distress.
    This force is in me, it is brilliant, I know it, and I give thanks to it every day. This source in which this energy flows runs through us all, it shines in each of us, it challenges our cultures, our education and our beliefs.
    I wish everyone who reads your article today to feel this energy and strength.
    I think for these many years of practice that this source and that this energy are only Love and that they open the doors to us of a happiness which is held there, right next to us. That he holds our hand so firmly that it would never occur to him to let go of us.

    Tout fort πŸŒΉπŸŒΊπŸ’–

    Corinne
    P.S: I will come back to the previous article.
    I started to read it, but I need some time for you

    Liked by 6 people

  17. Dear Corinne, what would I do without you?! Your analytical comments and the way you add illuminating facts, improve the understanding to other readers. I cannot thank you enough! Thank you for also taking the time to do so, as I know how busy your life is right now.

    Love,

    Joanna

    Liked by 4 people

  18. Thank you again, greatly appreciated!!

    Love,

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  19. Today I will try to take the time, and then I would like to write an article on something that I have read in the press.
    I hope that the words will know how to roll under my fingers …

    Love,

    Corinne

    Liked by 4 people

  20. With your talent? The words will flow! I will be waiting.

    Love,

    Joanna

    Liked by 4 people

  21. Thank you, and see you soon!

    Love,

    Joanna

    Liked by 4 people

  22. Earlier we used to be told that a healthy mind resides in a healthy body, but now it is vice versa. The book by Bruce Lipton is an eye-opener, that shows how our thoughts affect our cells and body. Pert has rightly pointed out that the molecules of emotions generated by brain play a decisive role.

    The problem lies within ourselves. We are the masters of our fates, if we think positively. The brain can convince the body- the placebo effect is real. Positive affirmations make a lot of sense. The real life experiences of Corinne are quite inspiring.

    I also believe that the quality of childhood has a bearing on the adult life too. But I have seen people with difficult childhood overcoming it by sheer will-power. In all, a good review, once again, Joanna.

    The beginning and end of quotes by Terry Eagleton and Gandhi respectively coupled with the garlic booster add a lot of values to your post. Thank you, Joanna.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Yes, my comment is missing. Should I post it again, Joanna?

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Thank you! You are the Greatest!

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Welcome and thanks!!

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Earlier we used to be told that a healthy mind resides in a healthy body, but now it is vice versa. The Biology of Beliefs by Bruce Lipton is like an eye-opener, that shows how our thoughts affect our cells and the body as a whole. Pert has rightly pointed out that the ‘molecules of emotions’ generated by brain play a decisive role in this regard.

    The problem in fact lies within ourselves. We are the masters of our fates, if we think and act positively. The brain convinces the body- the placebo effect is real. Positive affirmations make a lot of sense in shaping our thoughts and behaviour. The real life experiences shared by Corinne are worth emulating.

    The quality of childhood has a bearing on the adult life too. But I have seen people overcoming the adverse impact of difficult childhood by their sheer willpower. In all, a good review, once again, Joanna.

    The beginning and end of the quotes by Terry Eagleton and Gandhi respectively coupled with the garlic booster added a lot of values to your post. Thank you, Joanna.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Dear Kaushal, thank you so much for your kindness!! I wouldn’t miss your wonderful analysis of my post for all the tea in China!
    Even though I understand and agree with Bruce, there are exceptions to every rule. Professor Hawkins was one. For a different reason, I am another. The book is fascinating to read, and I did put the essence of his theory in the post, but there are so many interesting facts that I would recommend buying it for everyone.

    Thank you, KK!

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Joanna, this is a very special post! I have just ordered the book to add to my search for understanding myself. Yes! Even though I’m into my senior years, I still have a journey to make, and the direction of this post just adds to my knowledge. After a life of stress and trauma, I can’t thank you enough for your guidance. You and dear, dear Corinne (πŸ’Œ) have allowed me to believe in myself again! Bless you, both! πŸ’–πŸ’–
    Then you mention garlic! Well, I have about ten garlic bulbs growing in the garden, sourced in Scotland (yes, Scotland, because I needed them to grow here in the open in the cold north). This August they will be a perfect gift from Mother Earth! I will celebrate their generosity then!
    Meanwhile, I continue to read Robin Wall Kimmerer’s book Braiding Sweetgrass, which is having a huge impact on my outlook too!
    Dear Joanna, perhaps, God willing, we can meet later this year, and I will bring you one of my garlic bulbs. πŸ’—πŸ’–πŸ˜˜πŸ˜˜πŸ˜˜

    Liked by 6 people

  29. I agree, Joanna. There is always an antithesis of a thesis. In science, we accept what is considered today as true, but when something new is discovered, we start believing in that. The cycle goes on and that makes this world interesting and livable. Thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

  30. You are welcome!

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Dear Ashley, you are such a special friend! Always full of praise and encouragement to do more interesting posts. It really is such a pleasure to know that I have a place in your heart, even if it is the shape of garlic! It would be wonderful to meet in late summer.
    Look after garlic, and I hope we can meet up. I have Braiding Sweetgrass too…

    Thank you.

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Thank you and greatly appreciated!

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Im grateful that i found Bruce Lipton when i first started to wake up. His work has transformed my life forever and the lives of those around me

    Liked by 5 people

  34. Thank you for your inspirational comment about Bruce Lipton’s influence on your life.

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  35. This is a very interesting post Joanna! I have experienced some of what he is saying about subconscious mind connections. I have found concentrating on music relieves pain. Activity also distracts the mind from pain. It is much like learning to play the chords on a guitar in a manual manner and then at some point the subconscious mind takes over and the fingers automatically go where they are trained to go while you sing the words.
    Thank you for sharing this!

    Liked by 5 people

  36. Thank you for this beautiful review Joanna. I am definitely going to get one! Two statements that stood out for me and I noted down so I remember those always are ‘your biology adapts to your beliefs’ and that ‘energy is a more efficient means of affecting matter than chemicals.’ I only hope that allopathy, that touts itself to be the most modern and evolved branch of medicine and healing, and in many areas, rightly so, also starts investing in the mind and making it a part of itself rather than distancing it considering other forms of healing, though selectively,
    as fraudulent or inferior. It will very greatly add to its value.

    Liked by 5 people

  37. Thank you, I thought it would be interesting to many readers. Activity is very important, it helps alleviate many problems.

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  38. Thank you, Shveta, for your kind comments, I agree with Lipton’s advice because I think we overuse drugs to a dangerous degree.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  39. Thank you, greatly appreciated.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  40. You’re very welcome. Looking forward to more insightful articles from you Joanna! This indeed made my Sunday a little more cheerful! Happy weekend to you!

    Liked by 3 people

  41. πŸ™ indeed, auto hypnosis is a nightly thing habit for meπŸ™

    Liked by 2 people

  42. Thank you. I am glad that you have found something that works.

    Joanna

    Liked by 3 people

  43. Great, great read! Beautifully done. I used to believe medicine should be the first option, but after many terrible reactions to modern meds I now believe it should be the last option of treatment and a holistic approach as well as traditional medicine should be used first (such as garlic as you pointed out). Also, it has never made sense to me that science/medicine doesn’t take more time looking at natural cures instead of making new harmful ones, with a million unknown side effects, especially when the human race survived for thousands of years without modern technology. The two (modernity and traditional) should work in tandem instead of against each other. Also, that was very interesting about the subconscious and conscious mine. That makes sense that 95% of our live would be ruled by the subconscious, the part of the mind that is harder to know and understand. There is a lot to positive thinking, especially if we can train both parts of the minds to it, it seems. Lovely work. Another week well-done!

    Liked by 4 people

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